Search

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Reduced hip strength is associated with increased hip motion during running in young adult and adolescent male long-distance runners.

Authors: Taylor-Haas JA, Hugentobler JA, DiCesare CA, Hickey Lucas KC, Bates NA, Myer GD, Ford KR

Anterior knee pain is one of the most common running symptoms reported in the literature.  While the exact etiology is unknown, a lack of hip strength is suggested to contribute to abnormal running mechanics.  The purpose of this research study was to evaluate the association between isokinetic hip strength and 3-D running kinematics. The authors found that peak isokinetic hip extensor torque was inversely correlated with transverse plane hip ROM (r = -.387, p = .026) but was not significantly related to sagittal plane hip ROM or frontal plane hip ROM.  Peak isokinetic hip abductor torque was inversely correlated with frontal plane hip ROM (r=-.462, p=.008) but was not significantly related to either sagittal plane hip ROM or transverse plane hip ROM.  Peak isokinetic hip extensor torque and peak isokinetic hip abductor torque were not significantly related to knee kinematics in any plane.  Therefore, the authors concluded that peak isokinetic hip extensor torque and peak isokinetic hip abductor torque are associated with transverse plane and frontal plane femoral kinematics but not knee kinematics.  Runners with decreased hip strength exhibited increased frontal and transverse plane hip motion.

Abstract Full Article (subscribers only)  |  Purchase Article